EpiBurn Pro Review (Updated 2018)

Our Rating

EpiBurn Pro Review

EpiBurn Pro is an “advanced fat burning formula” from USPlabs. It costs around $40 for 90 capsules, which you can take either once or twice a day.

These diet pills claim to:

  • Suppress your appetite
  • Increase your energy levels
  • Improve body composition
  • Enhance your physical appearance

The guys at USP Labs call EpiBurn Pro “one of the most advanced products ever”. This is nothing new, as everyone claims to be the best – so we’ll just let the facts do the talking in this EpiBurn Pro review…

About the Company

USPlabs is a supplement company based in Dallas, Texas in the USA. As well as EpiBurn Pro, the company also makes and sells Jack3d (a popular pre-workout), protein powders, BCAA, Creatine, and even vitamins.

The company was founded in 2006, and its products have become very popular over the years. Despite this, USPlabs was subject to a lawsuit in 2015[1], amid claims it hid illegal stimulants in Jack3d and OxyElite Pro under the guise of a “geranium flower powder.”

The lawsuit was later “dismissed with prejudice”[2].

EpiBurn Pro Ingredients and How They Work

A first glance at EpiBurn Pro label reveals something we never want to see: A proprietary blend.

Note: Proprietary blends are lists of ingredients that hide important dose information.

We – and any nutrition experts worth their salt – hate proprietary blends. Why? Because they allow companies to fool consumers into believing they’re buying a superior product when the opposite is true.

See the list of ingredients below:

epiburn pro ingredients

Withania Somnifera Root 

Also known as Ashwagandha, Withania Somnifera is a potent adaptogen that you’ll find in some of the best test boosters on the market.

Research shows the herb is great for reducing stress[3], increasing power output[4] and lowering fatigue[5]. It’s possible USPlabs includes it in this fat burner to help reduce the tiredness that can come from lowering your calorie intake.

But does Withania Somnifera burn fat?

While the power to burn fat is not one of its greatest strengths, the herb may induce fat loss in untrained people undertaking weight training[6]. However, there’s no evidence it does the same for trained, healthy people.

Olea Europea Leaf Extract

More commonly known as Olive Leaf, Olea Europea Extract contains a number of potentially active ingredients. These include oleuropein, which appears to lower LDL oxidation[7] and blood sugar[8] (both of which are closely related to fat mass).

But despite this promise, Olive Leaf does not appear to directly affect weight loss. As a result, this may be a useless addition to the EpiBurn formula.

Yohimbe Bark Extract

Yohimbe is an evergreen tree native to central Africa – and its active ingredient is Yohimbine, the bark of the tree.

Yohimbine antagonizes the alpha-2-andrenoceptors[9], which (in theory) can mobilize adipose tissue and promote fat loss. And marketers have been quick to pounce on this fact to peddle Yohimbe as a fat burner.

However, studies on Yohimbe as a fat-loss aid have led to mixed results. One study by Ostojic, SM et al describes Yohimbe supplementation as a “suitable fat loss strategy”[10]. Yet further research by  Sax, L states “Yohimbine does not affect fat distribution in men”[11].

With all of this in mind, it’s disappointing to see the USPlabs be so quick to jump on the bandwagon by including Yohimbe in EpiBurn Pro.

And it gets worse…

An article published by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health Yohimbine states “Yohimbe has been associated with heart attacks and seizures”[12].

Meanwhile, WebMD lists Yohimbe as “POSSIBLY UNSAFE” when taken by mouth[13]. See the Side Effects section for more info.

As a result of these safety concerns, we wouldn’t usually touch Yohimbe with a 20-foot pole – and you should also stay well away from it!

See SupplementTester’s Highest Rated
Highest-Rated Fat Burners Here

Coleus Forskohlii 

Coleus Forskohlii is a herb said to help cut fat. It contains enzymes that activate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which can help the body break down fatty acids[14] and help users lose weight or fat mass.

Early research suggests the plant induces fat loss in obese women[15] and overweight men[16]. But despite Coleus Forskohlii’s promise as a fat burner, there are much better-studied and more potent options out there.

Nelumbo Nucifera Seed Extract

Nelumbo Nucifera (aka Sacred Lotus or Indian Lotus) contains high amounts of phenolics[17], which have been seen to reduce fat mass in mice. However, there’s no proof it does the same for human users.

Nelumbo Nucifera is also touted as an appetite suppressant. Marketers base this claim on a rat study that showed the flower appears to reduce food intake when mixed with Taurine[18]. But again, there’s no evidence it can suppress the human appetite.

Caffeine

Caffeine is a safe and popular stimulant – as long as you use the right dose. It’s also highly effective – and there’s no wonder 90% of American adults use the stimulant[19] in one of its many forms every day.

By antagonizing the adenosine receptors[20], the stimulant makes you feel more alert[21], focused[22] and driven[23]. Taking it is a great way to replace the energy you lose on a low-calorie diet.

To help fight diet-related fatigue throughout the day, we advise you take it in four 75mg servings spread over your day. USPlabs recommends taking EpiBurn in one or two daily servings. With this in mind, the 100mg of Caffeine per capsule is too much to take in one hit and could lead to jittery feelings.

But the maximum daily dose of 200mg that USPlabs recommends is also not enough to help you fight fatigue around the clock.

epiburn pro bottle

See SupplementTester’s Highest Rated
Highest-Rated Fat Burners Here

EpiBurn Pro Side Effects

EpiBurn Pro contains some ingredients that may cause adverse side effects. One of the milder side effects includes:

  • Frequent bowel movement and loose stools (Coleus Forskohlii[24])

Most Yohimbe supplements appear to contain it in “pharmaceutical quantities”[25], while dosages are “inaccurately labeled.” This is a real cause for concern because a study by Linden CH et al[26] shows Yohimbe may cause:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Palpitations
  • Chest pains
  • Hypertension
  • Tachycardia
  • Tremors

EpiBurn Pro Discontinued? An Update

Since we first reviewed EpiBurn Pro back in 2015, the people at USPlabs have removed it from the company website. It’s still available from third parties on sites like Amazon, but these are likely to be from an old batch.

Could it be that EpiBurn Pro suffered the same issues as its controversial predecessor, OxyElite Pro[27]? We’ll never know – and that’s part of the problem.

EpiBurn Pro Pros and Cons

Pros:

  • Caffeine may replace energy lost on a low-calorie diet
  • Withania Somnifera is may help untrained people lose weight
  • EpiBurn Pro never subject to the same health concerns or legal issues as other USPlabs products

Cons:

  • Proprietary blend is an insult to consumers
  • Yohimbe may cause a range of severe adverse side effects
  • Coleus Forskohlii may cause excessive bowel movements
  • Provides too much Caffeine in one hit and too little for daily use
  • No evidence Nelumbo Nucifera can suppress human appetite
  • Olive Leaf does not appear to induce fat loss
  • EpiBurn appears to be discontinued (still available from third parties)

See SupplementTester’s Highest Rated
Highest-Rated Fat Burners Here

EpiBurn Pro Review Conclusion

The best thing we can say about EpiBurn Pro is that it isn’t the worst fat burner we’ve ever tested. But then again, that ain’t saying much.

The good stuff

To be fair, EpiBurn contains some high-quality ingredients. These include Withania Somnifera (a potent adaptogen) and Caffeine (a proven stimulant).

The bad stuff

To start off, even the good ingredients in EpiBurn Pro have their issues – Ashwagandha is better suited as a cognition enhancer or test booster than as a fat burner. Meanwhile, the fat burner contains too little Caffeine for daily use and not enough for daily use.

Elsewhere, EpiBurn Pro contains nutrients that either undertested (Nelumbo) or discredited for their intended purpose (Olive Leaf).

But here’s the worst thing about this product: Yohimbe. This ingredient has strong links with a number of severe – and possibly life-changing – side effects.

For all of these reasons, we advise bypassing EpiBurn in favor of a fat burner with properly-dosed ingredients that are proven not just to be effective, but safe.

References

  1. U.S. (2018). U.S. files criminal charges against sellers of Jack3d, other…. [online] Available at: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-doj-investigation-dietarysupplements/u-s-files-criminal-charges-lawsuits-against-sellers-of-jack3d-other-supplements-idUSKCN0T628320151118 [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  2. Natural Products INSIDER. (2018). USPlabs Overcomes Lawsuit Claiming DMAA in Supplement Contributed to Soldiers Death. [online] Available at: https://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/litigation/usplabs-overcomes-lawsuit-claiming-dmaa-supplement-contributed-soldiers-death [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  3. Chandrasekhar, K et al (2012). A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of Ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine, 34(3), p.255.
  4. Wankhede, S et al (2015). Examining the effect of Withania somnifera supplementation on muscle strength and recovery: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12(1).
  5. Cooley, K., Szczurko, O., Perri, D., Mills, E., Bernhardt, B., Zhou, Q. and Seely, D. (2009). Naturopathic Care for Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial ISRCTN78958974. PLoS ONE, 4(8), p.e6628.
  6. Raut, A., Rege, N., Shirolkar, S., Pandey, S., Tadvi, F., Solanki, P., Vaidya, R., Vaidya, A. and Kene, K. (2012). Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in healthy volunteers. Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine, 3(3), p.111.
  7. Chandrasekhar, K., Kapoor, J. and Anishetty, S. (2012). A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of Ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine, 34(3), p.255.
  8. Du, H., You, J., Zhao, X., Park, J., Kim, S. and Chang, K. (2010). Antiobesity and hypolipidemic effects of lotus leaf hot water extract with taurine supplementation in rats fed a high fat diet. Journal of Biomedical Science, 17(Suppl 1), p.S42.
  9. Verwaerde, P., Tran, M. and Montastruc, J. (1997). Effects of yohimbine, an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, on experimental neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology, 11(6), pp.567-575.
  10. Ostojic, S. (2006). Yohimbine: The Effects on Body Composition and Exercise Performance in Soccer Players. Research in Sports Medicine, 14(4), pp.289-299.
  11. L, S. (2018). Yohimbine does not affect fat distribution in men. – PubMed – NCBI. [online] Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1960007 [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  12. NCCIH. (2018). Yohimbe. [online] Available at: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/yohimbe [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  13. Yohimbe: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, and Warning. [online] Webmd.com. Available at: https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-759/yohimbe [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  14. Luiken, J et al. (2002). Effects of cAMP modulators on long-chain fatty-acid uptake and utilization by electrically stimulated rat cardiac myocytes. Biochemical Journal, 367(3), pp.881-887.
  15. GA, G. (2018). Regional fat loss from the thigh in obese women after adrenergic modulation. – PubMed – NCBI. [online] Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2894247 [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  16. Godard, M., Johnson, B. and Richmond, S. (2005). Body Composition and Hormonal Adaptations Associated with Forskolin Consumption in Overweight and Obese Men. Obesity Research, 13(8), pp.1335-1343.
  17. Limwachiranon, J. et al (2018). Lotus Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids: Health Promotion and Safe Consumption Dosages. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, 17(2), pp.458-471.
  18. Du, H. et al (2010). Antiobesity and hypolipidemic effects of lotus leaf hot water extract with taurine supplementation in rats fed a high fat diet. Journal of Biomedical Science, 17(Suppl 1), p.S42.
  19. Www1.villanova.edu. (2018). About Caffeine | Villanova University. [online] Available at: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/studentlife/health/promotion/goto/resources/drugs/caffeine.html [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  20. Ribeiro, J. and Sebastião, A. (2010). Caffeine and Adenosine. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 20(s1), pp.S3-S15.
  21. Barry, R., Clarke, A. and Johnstone, S. (2011). Caffeine and opening the eyes have additive effects on resting arousal measures. Clinical Neurophysiology, 122(10), pp.2010-2015.
  22. The Hub. (2018). Caffeine has positive effect on memory, Johns Hopkins researchers say. [online] Available at: https://hub.jhu.edu/2014/01/12/caffeine-enhances-memory/ [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  23. Research, I. and Marriott, B. (2018). Effects of Caffeine on Cognitive Performance, Mood, and Alertness in Sleep-Deprived Humans. [online] Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK209050/#top [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  24. Ods.od.nih.gov. (2018). Office of Dietary Supplements – Dietary Supplements for Weight Loss. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/WeightLoss-HealthProfessional/ [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].
  25. Cohen, P. et al (2015). Pharmaceutical quantities of yohimbine found in dietary supplements in the USA. Drug Testing and Analysis, 8(3-4), pp.357-369.
  26. Linden, C. et al (1985). Yohimbine: A new street drug. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 14(10), pp.1002-1004.
  27. Voice, F. (2018). FDA Uses New Authorities To Get OxyElite Pro Off the Market | FDA Voice. [online] Blogs.fda.gov. Available at: https://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/index.php/2013/11/fda-uses-new-authorities-to-get-oxyelite-pro-off-the-market/ [Accessed 11 Sep. 2018].